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What are the requirements of Green Star certification?

To be eligible for Green Star certification, you will need to determine which category your project fits into by referring to the Green Star rating tool. The four Green Star rating tools include:

Green Star – Communities

The Communities tool assesses the design and construction plans of large-scale projects within a precinct or neighbourhood. The five categories of Community projects include:

  • Governance – the showcase of community building and leadership.
  • Liveability – the ability for communities to demonstrate a sense of inclusiveness, opportunity and safety.
  • Economic prosperity – the encouragement of productivity, suitable living arrangements and educational investments.
  • The environment – limiting environmental footprint by managing infrastructure and transport.
  • Innovation – strategies that aim to improve sustainability within the physical environment.

Green Star – Design and as Built

The Design and Built tool assesses the sustainability of new building constructions and significant refurbishments across nine categories. These include:

  • Management – promotes and rewards efforts of sustainability throughout the project’s life including its design, construction and operations.
  • Indoor environment quality (IEQ) – promotes a project’s comfort features such as air quality and its thermal and acoustic comfort.
  • Energy – promotes efforts aimed to lower greenhouse gas emissions by using alternative energy sources.
  • Transport – rewards projects that reduce the dependency of car transport and encourages alternative transportation methods.
  • Water – promotes and rewards efforts aimed at reducing consumption of potable water.
  • Materials – acknowledges the excessive consumption of resources and aims to encourage the use of materials with a lower environmental impact.
  • Land use and ecology – rewards projects which aim to reduce the negative impact of urban development and increase the capability of local ecology.
  • Emissions – encourages efforts to lower the environmental effects of ‘point source’ pollution to the water and air atmospheres and fauna.
  • Innovation – strategies that aim to improve sustainable practices within the physical environment.

Green Star – Interiors

The Interiors tool assesses the sustainability of interior fitout constructions across nine categories:

These include:

  • Management – promotes and rewards efforts of sustainability throughout the project’s life including its design, construction and operations.
  • Indoor environment quality (IEQ) – promotes a project’s comfort features such as air quality and its thermal and acoustic comfort.
  • Energy – promotes efforts aimed to lower greenhouse gas emissions by using alternative energy sources.
  • Transport – rewards projects that reduce the dependency of car transport and encourages alternative transportation methods.
  • Water – promotes and rewards efforts aimed at reducing consumption of potable water.
  • Materials – acknowledges the excessive consumption of resources and aims to encourage the use of materials with a lower environmental impact.
  • Land use and ecology – rewards projects which aim to reduce the negative impact of urban development and increase the capability of local ecology.
  • Emissions – encourages efforts to lower the environmental effects of ‘point source’ pollution to the water and air atmospheres and fauna.
  • Innovation – strategies that aim to improve sustainable practices within the physical environment.

Green Star – Performance

The Performance tool assesses the operational performance of building constructions across nine categories:

  • Management – promotes and rewards projects that practice outcomes of sustainability.
  • Indoor environment quality (IEQ) – aims to achieve occupants’ comfort and well-being through the experience of space.
  • Energy – rewards projects that take actions to lower a building’s energy consumption compared to that of buildings with standard practices.
  • Transport – rewards projects that reduce occupants’ dependency on vehicles with a capacity of a single occupant and encourages the use of alternative modes of transportation.
  • Water – promotes and rewards efforts aimed at reducing consumption of potable water in buildings that use cooling, irrigation and occupant amenities compared to that of buildings with standard practices.
  • Materials – acknowledges excessive consumption of resources during the operational phase of the building’s life and waste management.
  • Land use and ecology – rewards projects which aim to reduce the local ecology of a building’s location and promotes environmental restoration.
  • Emissions – encourages efforts to lower the environmental effects of ‘point source’ pollution to the water and air atmospheres.
  • Innovation – strategies that aim to improve sustainable practices within the physical environment.

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Green Star FAQ:

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